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Fletcher’s Atlanta Exhibition Well Received

Atlanta Exhibition

 

Margaret Fletcher’s exhibition of new works, OCUS 11 ante litteram, at the Sandler Hudson Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia, September 14‒October 26, was well received. Fletcher, an Assistant Professor of Architecture in the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, exhibited works on paper, encaustic, and dry transfer that examined the overlap of architecture and art.

Felicia Feaster writes in her review, “Seeing the eternal in a tumble of tiny letters” in the Atlanta Journal Constitution on October 10,“Margaret Fletcher’s unique, letter-based art… her haunting distinctive paintings… both stark, minimalist and strangely emotional… is the focus of a memorable exhibition…. She manages to make a poetic connection between abstract forms and tiny alphabet letters and the human experience. Her work suggests a collision of the human—represented by letters—and the external.” (For more go to: http://www.accessatlanta.com/news/entertainment/seeing-the-eternal-in-a-tumble-of-tiny-letters/nbGLD/.

From her artist talk on October 12, Fletcher says, “I always get asked about the title of the show… OCUS 11 ante litteram. OCUS is a word I made up—that will make a little more sense in a minute. Ante litteram is a Latin phrase that literally translates to ‘before the letters’ but means ‘before the term existed’ so the thing existed before there was a word or words to describe it. So in some ways that’s where I find myself in this situation with this particular body of work. I’m hit with the irony that here is the moment where I need words to describe the very things that I can’t describe with words. If I could write about it I would… but since I can’t write about it… I paint or draw to try to get close to the ideas… to try to point to these larger concepts that I can’t describe verbally.

I’d also like to say that these ideas I’m pointing to are never very clear…they are a fuzzy cloud that floats above your head with tiny moments in clarity that I grab on to and work from just to have the whole thing slip back into the fuzzy cloud.  That phenomenon of work is something that designers deal with all the time since you are creating something that doesn’t exist yet… it hasn’t yet come into being. The trick is to recognize it when it arrives.”

Catherine Fox in her October 11 review, “Gallery notes: at Sandler Hudson, Margaret’s Fletcher’s luscious allusions, letter by letter,” for Arts ATL writes, “Margaret Fletcher’s abstract drawings and paintings are as sensuous as they are allusive…. all of them bear witness to the pleasure that Fletcher finds in the labor of the hand, and her pleasure becomes ours.” (To read the full review, go to: http://www.artsatl.com/2013/10/gallery-notes-margaret-fletcher/. In her gallery.)

As Fletcher explains in her artist’s statement, “My current work focuses specifically on issues of cognition, connection, and articulation and often relies on the swarming and flocking of a variety of spatial systems. As an architect, artist and graphic designer, I find constant inspiration and overlap between these disciplines—an essential process that influences my practice through spatial, numerical and natural constructs.”

Fletcher has a combined twenty years of experience in the design realm, specifically in architectural design, and has been inspired by the rigor of practice. She has published widely about research related to architecture and spatial perception and won numerous awards for art, architecture, and graphic design. Most recently, Fletcher was named a Fellow of the Hambidge Creative Residency Program and was finalist for the Forward Arts Foundation 2012 Emerging Artist Award.  She was a Studio Artist at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center from 2009‒2011. She has exhibited work in galleries and museums throughout North America including Atlanta, New York, Chicago, Cincinnati, Boston and Toronto.