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APLA Alum Marlon Blackwell Architect Receives Multiple Honors for Work

AU APLA Alum and Paul Rudolph Visiting Fellow (2008) Marlon Blackwell, and his firm Marlon Blackwell Architect, was awarded Residential Architect's2011 Leadership Award for Best Firm (http://www.residentialarchitect.com/award-winners/an-ozark-mountain-setting-nurtures-marlon-blackwe.aspx) as well as a 2012 Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects for the Ruth Lily Visitor’s Pavilion at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.  Blackwell has regularly been recognized for his leadership in academics and design, developing a portfolio of diverse and award–winning work.  Founded in 1990, Marlon Blackwell states that they are “a design centered critical practice” that “pride(s) itself in providing clients with good buildings that not only satisfy their needs but also elevate their community’s interests and the unique qualities of each site and program.” (http://www.marlonblackwell.com/index.html)

 

The definition offered for the Honor Award for Architecture states that it “recognizes achievements for a broad range of architectural activity to elevate the general quality of architecture practice, establish a standard of excellence against which all architects can measure performance, and inform the public of the breadth and value of architecture practice.” (http://www.aia.org/practicing/awards/2012/architecture/)

As Blackwell’s first national public building, the The Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion is “both threshold and destination at 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art and Nature Park, which opened in June 2010 at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.  The design was conceived from porous leaves, found on the forest floor, which had been devoured by insects. Placed among trees, the pavilion is located on the single acre of the 100 in the park that is suitable for construction, due to the pervasive flooding. The structure – made from ipe wood from Brazil, charred cedar wood from Indiana, steel, acrylic and glass – rests on steel posts above landscaped mounds.

“This pavilion is artfully cast in the shadows of the adjacent trees, its transparency is enhanced by its latticed canopy which filters light [through] its entirety and the floor to ceiling glazing hides no secrets,” the jury noted. “Its low posture and horizontal form enhances the encompassing flora and is quite elegant in its lightness while reaching out and inviting nature in.”



This is the firm’s first national AIA Honor Award for Architecture. (From a University of Arkansas press release, FAYETTEVILLE, Ark)

 



This is the firm’s first national AIA Honor Award for Architecture. (From a University of Arkansas press release, FAYETTEVILLE, Ark)

For more on this award visit: http://www.residentialarchitect.com/award-winners/an-ozark-mountain-setting-nurtures-marlon-blackwe.aspx