Skip directly to content

AIA’s Youngest Licensed Architects Have Ties to Auburn University and APLA

Brett and Sandoval Youngest Architects story

Auburn's architecture program has been gaining some recognition from some of its youngest alums. First, Courtney Brett, and then, Rosannah Sandoval, became the AIA's youngest licensed architects, in 2012 and 2013, respectively.

Ms. Brett, who transferred to Auburn University’s School of Architecture when she was sixteen, graduated in 2007, at age twenty. While attending Auburn, she participated in Rural Studio. After graduation, she began working for Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, one of the largest architectural firms in the world. She spent the next two and a half years with the firm in New York, on projects such as the New York Jets’ training center, schools and hospitals, and a petroleum complex in Doha, Qatar. In 2010, Ms. Brett headed back to the Gulf Coast of Alabama to work for DHS Ventures as a director of design. Recently, in 2012, she established her own firm, Casburn Brett Architecture, based out of Daphne, Alabama. It was also in 2012 that Ms. Brett became the (then) youngest active Architect member of the AIA, at age twenty-four. The accolades that followed have included articles in The Wall Street Journal, The Mobile Press-Register, and Architizer.com.

Read the Architizer.com article.

 

Ms. Sandoval has a similar story, in that she finished her architecture degree  at the age of eighteen. Ms. Sandoval completed the first two years of her professional degree at Auburn, where she participated in Rural Studio. She relocated with her family to California, where she completed her degree at CCA. In 2013, Ms. Sandoval replaced Brett as the youngest active Architect member of the AIA, at twenty-three. She works as a designer in Perkins + Will's San Francisco office, and has been a team member on such highly-praised projects as Calexico West Land Port of Entry, which won a 2013 Progressive/Architecture Award from Architect Magazine.

Read the AIA article on Ms. Sandoval.