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90_20 Alumni Profiles

90_20 Alumni Profiles

In anticipation of the 90_20 Interior Architecture / Interior Design anniversary celebration on March 31, 2017, StudioAPLA and the CADC website are featuring several College of Architecture, Design and Construction Interior Design and Interior Architecture alumni and their remarkable accomplishments. Each alumnus was asked to provide a short biographical statement, and some also took the opportunity to answer profile questions.

The 90_20 Interior Architecture / Interior Design Anniversary Celebration Alumni Profile series is pleased to present a profiles of Amanda Herron Loper, a 2005 graduate of architecture and interior architecture, Andy Goldsborough, a 1989 interior design graduate and Margaret Nysewander, a 1994 interior design graduate and 1995 graduate of landscape architecture.

image of interior pf Saint Frank Coffee by Amanda Loper

Amanda Herron Loper:

Amanda Loper, AIA, LEED AP, is a Principal at David Baker Architects, an award-winning architecture and interiors firm in San Francisco that is known for combining social concern with a signature design character. In 2012, DBA was selected as the AIA California Council’s Distinguished Practice. For the past decade at DBA, Amanda has collaboratively designed a diverse range of projects throughout the San Francisco Bay Area—ranging from housing for the formerly homeless to market-rate communities to custom retail spaces.

Inspired by her tenure at Rural Studio in 2002, Amanda works to bring social awareness to issues of housing and density within the urban setting. Amanda has a particular interest in designing the ground level for an active, organic public realm and in making a place for people. She writes, presents, and curates panels for SPUR (San Francisco Planning and Urban Research) focused on density, housing solutions, and urban vitality. For two years, she has served as a board member for the San Francisco Housing Action Coalition (SFHAC), where she chairs the project review committee. 

Amanda has recently led the research, design development, and community outreach for San Francisco’s Affordable Housing Bonus Program, a comprehensive density study establishing City density guidelines. An exhibit based on some of her work developing design principles that build and bolster community is set to be included in an upcoming exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum.

Amanda continues to work on large and small projects, including a series of café and roastery spaces for Saint Frank Coffee; boutique hotels in California Wine Country; and the first 100 percent affordable housing project in more than a decade in the Mission District, the center of San Francisco’s housing crisis.

image of interior by Andy Goldsborough

Andy Goldsborough:

Founded in 2001, Andy Goldsborough Interior Design offers an array of comprehensive interior design services, catering especially to both new and seasoned art collectors.  Distinctly modern in both conception and execution, the firm’s work infuses traditional decorative elements with the elegance of minimalism.  Bespoke furnishings, flourishes of color, and luxurious fabrics are interplayed and balanced with pure, functional use of space.  The firm’s work is hailed for its effortless intermixing of unparalleled art and furniture for the most esteemed collectors.

An Alabama native, Andy Goldsborough received his BFA in Interior Design from Auburn University in 1989. Before launching AGID in 2001, he worked with celebrated firms, Selldorf Architects and Kohn Pederson Fox Conway, on a variety of residential projects, the Federal Reserve Bank in Dallas, and two exhibitions at The Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum.  Andy’s enthusiasm and command of design has also led to his recent teaching position at Auburn University as well as Parsons the New School for Design.

The firm’s work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Architectural Digest, The Luxury Bathroom, Luxury Home Quarterly, Architectural Record’s Record Interior issue, and Metropolitan Home’s Small Spaces issue.  Andy’s passion for craftsmanship in design has led to the maturation of his highly acclaimed blog, THE GILDED OWL (http://thegildedowl.com/), and following, the curation and opening of its storefront gallery in Hudson, New York.

10 Profile Questions with Andy Goldsborough:

1. Is there a person or people at Auburn who helped advance your career?
There are three people who I attribute to opening my mind and advancing my career. Allan Hing gave me a real fundamental understanding of interior design and how space can be transformed; Gaines Blackwell helped give me an architectural facet to my work; and Sheri Schumacher inspired me with new ways of thinking about materials and finishes, which I still attribute to my design sensibility today.

2. Who is your role model and why?
My role model in life is my mom. She encouraged my design path and continues to inspire me daily. Her work in both landscaping and in how she thoughtfully designs and thinks about life every day is the reason I am at the place I am in my career. There are many architects and designers whom I look for inspiration, but she would be my role model. My mentor and role model in my career is Annabelle Selldorf, whom I had the great fortune of working with in her office.  The way she thinks about spaces, proportion, and detail in the most elegant and quiet way has been a constant inspiration in my work. I'm thrilled to be collaborating with her on a new townhouse project in New York.

3. What project or accomplishment do you consider to be most significant in your career?
The house I designed for my parents and my gallery, which I designed in collaboration with my partner Elizabeth Moore.

4. What is your favorite work of interior design/architecture?
Gio Ponti's Parco di Principi Hotel in Sorrento, Italy and David Zwirner Gallery by Annabelle Selldorf in New York City.

5. What is the most innovative design you've created?
I'm currently working on developing prototypes for a home collection that I hope will be the most innovative work I've done thus far. And extending my range of carpets with my friend and collaborator Joe Carini, using new fibers and materials that have not been explored for this type of production.

6. How do you design an experience?
A good example is my latest collaboration with my partner Elizabeth Moore at our gallery in Hudson. For our fourth show that opened in February, we had chosen an artist, India Evans, who creates these extraordinary collages of found photographs, textiles, and discarded memorabilia that she then paints, embroiders, and assembles into these sensual and very feminine works.  Elizabeth owned one of her works, and we both loved the craftsmanship involved so we decided the main gallery and other rooms in the house would be transformed into a recreation of Carlo Mollino's home that I visited in Turin, Italy a couple of years ago.  I had photographed the apartment extensively, but we tried to use the similarity between Mollino's architecture and design aesthetic and all of these incredible women that he had photographed as a backdrop for India's work.
Since she had lived in Italy for five years, it was a natural relationship and Mollino's dramatic colors and textures in his home were used to create rooms inspired by him. Most of the furniture, objects, and even a triptych mural we commissioned were all found and created by local artisans in Hudson, New York.  We used the entire sequence of entering Casa Mollino's foyer then moving through the living room, dining room, and his bedroom as an integral part of experiencing the thirty-four works of the artist and at the same time being able to envision what the work would like in a real environment and not just in an expected white gallery space.

7. What is your creative approach or your process in solving design problems?
I start by determining the parameters, both real and perceived, of the given situation. From there any problem or limitation simply becomes a challenge. In thinking outside the box, these challenges often inspire entirely new conceptions and possibilities.

8. Do you prefer to collaborate on new ideas or do your best ideas come from deep thinking?
Some of both.  I definitely think about design all the time but I thrive on coming up with an idea and then collaborating with my assistant to make it better.  I enjoy working with my studio and with my partner even if I do get inspired moments from time to time on my own.

9. How are you adapting your work to changes in the industry?
Because my business is primarily all residential, I'm not sure I'm necessarily adapting my work to changes in the industry, but I am constantly thinking of ways to use materials and finishes more thoughtfully.  I also have an increasing awareness and concern of where the materials are coming from and how they affect the planet.

10. What advice do you have for our future graduates?
Listen to your professors and follow your instincts as to where you want to practice and further your career.  New York City allowed me so many opportunities I wouldn't have had in other places and bouncing around from residential, retail and commercial work gave me a broader understanding of designing for a specific client and honing in on what direction I would eventually focus on.  

image of interior pf Saint Frank Coffee by Margaret Nysewander

Margaret Nysewander:

I graduated Auburn University with degrees in both Interior Design and Landscape Architecture by overlapping landscape related electives while in the Interior Design program. I moved from Auburn to Atlanta, Georgia in 1995 and have been here since that time. My focus has been corporate interiors over the past 20 years, and I have had the opportunity of working with and learning from some of the best designers in this field.

In 1998 I decided to go to architecture graduate school at Georgia Tech; after a year and half I was given an opportunity to design a furniture showroom. It was a tough decision to leave, but my joy has come so much from the client experience, I decided I was meant to be back in the field.

After working at Perkins and Will, in 2005 I accepted as position at ASD, a multi-disciplinary design firm committed to integrated design through the collaboration of their architecture, interiors, and graphics studios. Over the past 10 years I have been a lead designer and manager on projects of all scales and types. The diversity of work has been challenging and rewarding. In 2010 I was made an associate and in 2014 a principal. 

My successes are client driven; I make sure every project reflects the goals and culture of the business and individuals I work with thus no two projects look alike.

10 Profile Questions with Margaret Nysewander:

1. Is there a person or people at Auburn who helped advance your career?
Gaines Blackwell, Laura Prang, Sheri Schumacher, and Jack Williams were all very instrumental in my development as a designer and creative thinker. 

2. Who is your role model and why?
I don’t have one role model. I see how I can improve myself through my relationships with many of those around me.

3. What project or accomplishment do you consider to be most significant in your career?
Mentoring those around me and seeing them succeed.

4. What is your favorite work of interior design/architecture?
Barcelona Pavilion. 

5. What is the most innovative design you've created?
The next one.

6. How do you design an experience?
At each turn in a plan contemplating layers of space and views, never neglecting how impactful the ceiling plane is.

7. What is your creative approach or your process in solving design problems?
You have to clearly define the problem first. Every design decision you make should support the effort to solve it.

8. Do you prefer to collaborate on new ideas or do your best ideas come from deep thinking?
A combination of both for sure.

9. How are you adapting your work to changes in the industry?
Being flexible and open minded. Giving younger individuals more of a voice in office culture and project solutions.   

10. What advice do you have for our future graduates?
Learning the latest programs is essential; however, in my world space planning is critical to the start of a project, understanding what lines on paper feel like in reality is very important. Measure the spaces around you!